The popular podcast will be recording a special live episode at this year’s Fairtrade Fortnight (21 February to 6 March) for the Choose the World you Want Festival.

Ed Gillespie, environmental entrepreneur, writer, speaker, futurist and Sir Tim Smit, co-founder of the Eden Project, will join Cafédirect’s CEO John Steel to discuss the climate injustice faced by small-scale farmers in developing nations and how Fairtrade supports their resilience to the extreme challenges it brings.

Ed Gillespie says: “The climate crisis threatens the lives and livelihoods of millions of farmers that grow our food in low-income countries.  As a guest on the Building Better Business podcast my goal is to bring awareness to this injustice and how Fairtrade can help.”

Sir Tim Smit added: “Farmers in developing nations should be protected from unfair trade so that they can adapt to and mitigate climate change.  I look forward to coming together during Fairtrade Fortnight for the Building Better Business podcast.”

John Steel, CEO Cafédirect commented: “In support of the small-scale farmers whose existence is threatened by the effects of climate change, we will plant a tree for every episode download of our Building Better Business podcast series during Fairtrade Fortnight until 31 March. Peruvian coffee farmers have been amongst the worst affected by climate change and reforestation is a powerful way to restore their environment and benefit these communities.”

To help drive this awareness Cafédirect will plant a tree for every episode download of the Building Better Business podcast series during Fairtrade Fortnight until the end of March (21 February to 31 March).

Cafédirect’s non-profit implementation partner, Producers Direct will plant the trees as part of the climate smart agriculture project in Peru that is set to increase the incomes of 7,000 smallholder farmers in areas that are at high risk from the impacts of climate change.  Producers Direct report that 95% of their coffee producers have been impacted by climate change in the last decade, with less than 25% reporting they have the skills to strengthen resilience*. 

The Building Better Business podcast explores how business can shape the world for the better, with profit and principles working in harmony.  Host John Steel, CEO of social enterprise Cafédirect talks to inspirational thinkers and change makers on how business can create positive social and environmental impact, and how we can all help.

Register to watch the podcast discussion ‘Climate of crisis for farmers’ on Monday 28 February at 12pm at fairtrade.org.uk.

The podcast will be available to listen to on Apple Podcasts, Spotify and Google Podcasts on 4 March. For more information, visit www.cafedirect.co.uk/podcast.

*Producers Direct inhouse data of the smallholder farmers it represents.

Cafedirect podcast fairtrade fortnight

NOTES TO EDITORS

Cafédirect is proud to be the UK’s first and largest Fairtrade hot drinks brand with over 60% of our purchases certified as Soil Association Organic. We believe in being a force for good and here’s how we do it:

We share the profits

On top of the Fairtrade and Organic premiums we pay for our crops, we donate to Producers Direct which provides real sustainable support.

Producers are at the heart of everything we do.  With 8 board members, 2 of them are producers who contribute to the decisions that govern our business. And over half of our producer partners own shares in our company, making them direct beneficiaries of our success.

We integrate sustainability

We believe all our actions need to respect our environment. By weaving environmental and social strategies into our overall strategy, we have created a business which continually strives to reduce its environmental impact through our governing Gold Standard.

The way we buy

For a lot of our growers, Cafédirect was their first customer, giving them access to the market and the opportunity to expand and meet new buyers. When we buy our coffee, tea and cocoa, we work with the growers directly without middlemen to make sure they get a better price for their crop.